Improving biodiversity in apple orchards – an economic analysis

Luc Belzile, researcher

Luc Belzile

Researcher

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Contact Luc Belzile

Description

This project is being conducted by Université Laval, and IRDA is in charge of the economic analysis. The purpose of this initial, three-year project is to examine the impact of flower plantings on bumblebee biodiversity in apple orchards in southern Québec.

Objective(s)

  • Determine the impact of flower plantings on the diversity, abundance, and overwintering rate of bumblebee queens
  • Determine the influence of flower plantings on apple blossom pollination rate and fruit yield
  • Conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of planting flowers in apple orchards that could be adapted to other crops in Québec

From 2017 to 2020

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Ecosystem protection

Service

IRDA's economic analyses help assess the implementation costs and cost-effectiveness of farming practices.

Partenaires

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | Université Laval

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