Improving biodiversity in apple orchards – an economic analysis

Luc Belzile

Description

This project is being conducted by Université Laval, and IRDA is in charge of the economic analysis. The purpose of this initial, three-year project is to examine the impact of flower plantings on bumblebee biodiversity in apple orchards in southern Québec.

Objective(s)

  • Determine the impact of flower plantings on the diversity, abundance, and overwintering rate of bumblebee queens
  • Determine the influence of flower plantings on apple blossom pollination rate and fruit yield
  • Conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of planting flowers in apple orchards that could be adapted to other crops in Québec

From 2017 to 2020

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Ecosystem protection

Service

IRDA's economic analyses help assess the implementation costs and cost-effectiveness of farming practices.

Partenaires

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | Université Laval

This may interest you

2014-2017 • Fruit production

Variable economic injury for the apple leafcurling midge and modelling of population abundance of this emerging pest

The apple leafcurling midge is a new apple pest in Québec. The aim of the project is to explore the pest’s phenology, establish variable economic injury thresholds, and incorporate the results into a phenology model in CIPRA.

Researcher: Daniel Cormier

Read more about the project

Daniel Cormier
2014-2018 • Fruit production

Developing a cropping system for organic strawberries

In a high density strawberry crop grown in sod covered with plastic mulch, evaluate the toxicity of bioinsecticides for controlling tarnished plant bugs and strawberry blossom beetles and of bioherbicides for controlling weeds in and between crop rows.

Researcher: Daniel Cormier

Read more about the project

Daniel Cormier
2015-2016 • Fruit production

Productivity of healthy looking plants that have never received nitrogen fertilizer and that are located in a blueberry field infected by stunt disease

In highbush blueberry fields where stunt disease has been detected, plants that have never received nitrogen fertilizer are more vigorous and homogeneous than plants that have received nitrogen fertilizer.

Read more about the project

Carl Boivin
Christine Landry