Evaluation of the agronomic performance of 10 broccoli varieties under commercial production

Carl Boivin

Researcher, agr., M.Sc.

418 643-2380
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Description

This project aims to limit the impacts of climate change on broccoli crops by evaluating and documenting the tolerance to climatic stress of 10 broccoli varieties intended for the fresh market.

These trials will be conducted under commercial production conditions in Lanoraie in 2021 and 2022. The production schedule includes planting in late April, early June and early July, both in the field and under cover.

The instruments chosen will allow us to measure weather conditions and the microclimate in the cropping system and document the irrigation regime and water withdrawal for each variety based on the production conditions. This will allow us to determine if the crop has been subjected to a stress that has affected its development and yield.

The results of this project will be used to assist broccoli growers and provide tools to the advisors who work with them.

Objective(s)

Limiting the impacts of climate change on broccoli crops by evaluating and documenting the tolerance to climatic stress of 10 broccoli varieties for the fresh market.

  • Compare 10 fresh market broccoli varieties, eight of which will be selected based on the representative climate in Pennsylvania or New York.
  • Document the climate stress response of the 10 broccoli varieties in the field and under cover.
  • Document the irrigation regime.
  • Communicate the results to potential users.

From 2020 to 2023

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

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