Selection, mass rearing, and field efficiency of a predaceous strain of mullein bug

Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher

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Description

The goal of the project is to select a strain of the mullein bug to control two spotted and red spider mites from July to August (period when populations tend to explode).

Objective(s)

  • Select a voracious strain of spider mite predator through isogroup selection
  • Field test minimum mullein bug introduction rates required to keep spider mite populations below the economic threshold
  • Determine how long the predators stay on apple trees and how effective they are
  • Improve mass rearing techniques by testing two food sources and two host plants

From 2016 to 2019

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

IRDA will select a strain of mullein bug to control two-spotted and red spider mites, two major apple pests.

Partners

Université du Québec à Montréal | Centre de recherche agroalimentaire de Mirabel

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