Repellent properties of exclusion nets used for the control of leafroller and stink bug pests of apples

Gérald Chouinard, researcher

Gérald Chouinard

Researcher

450 653-7368
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Contact Gérald Chouinard

Description

The aim of the project was to measure the effect of certain natural repellents that can be used on different types of exclusion nets to reduce egglaying by new or resurgent pests such as the oriental fruit moth and the brown marmorated stink bug (Pentatomid), observed for the first time in Québec in 2007 and 2014, respectively.

Objective(s)

  • Measure the repellent effects of different treatments on exclusion nets used commercially in apple production in order to determine what parameters are the most effective in reducing egglaying by certain pests on the nets

From 2015 to 2018

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

Naturally occurring repellents can help control new pests such as the oriental fruit moth and the brown marmorated stink bug.

Growing Forward 2 | Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec - Innov'Action Programme | Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

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