Sustainable control methods for apple pests

Daniel Cormier, researcher

Daniel Cormier

Researcher

450 653-7368
ext 360

Contact Daniel Cormier
Gérald Chouinard, researcher

Gérald Chouinard

Researcher

450 653-7368
ext 340

Contact Gérald Chouinard

Description

This pan-Canadian project conducted in Ontario, Québec, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick focuses on strategies for controlling three key pests in apple production. These strategies will result in a lower environmental impact and improvements in production efficiency. The targeted pests are apple maggot, apple leafcurling midge, and obliquebanded leafroller.

Objective(s)

  • Develop a biological method to control the apple maggot
  • Increase our understanding of the phenology of the apple leafcurling midge
  • Study the role of plant volatile substances in attracting the obliquebanded leafroller

From 2018 to 2023

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

This project aims to develop environmentally sound methods for controlling apple pests.

Partners

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada | British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture | Canadian Horticultural Council | Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

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