Selecting low-risk insecticides to control cranberry weevil on cranberry farms

Annabelle Firlej, researcher

Annabelle Firlej

Researcher

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Contact Annabelle Firlej

Description

The cranberry weevil (Anthonomus musculus) feeds on cranberry plants, and overwintering females lay their eggs on the flower buds, causing the flowers to abort. There are few or no pesticides registered for this pest. The aim of this two-year project was to determine the efficacy of various pesticides in the field.

Objective(s)

  • Field test six organic and conventional insecticides against the cranberry weevil on two cranberry farms compared to an untreated control:
    • BIOCERES® WP
    • GRANDEVO (MBI-203)
    • VENERATE (MBI-206)
    • CALYPSO® 480SC
    • CORAGEN®
    • ACTARA® 25WG

From 2015 to 2017

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

IRDA is able to assess the effectiveness of a variety of biopesticides for many types of crops.

Partners

Ministère de l’Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation du Québec | Programme d'appui à la stratégie phytosanitaire québécoise en agriculture | Club environnemental et technique Atocas Québec

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