Assessing the potential of using granulated potato residues to produce animal feed, fertilizers, and energy

Christine Landry, researcher

Christine Landry

Researcher

418 643-2380
ext 640

Contact Christine Landry

Description

According to a study released in 2007 by Groupe AGECO on issues in the vegetable production industry, 80% of producers manage post harvest residues and 38% are very concerned about environmental standards in this regard. Potato producers are no exception. Managing potato residues is particularly problematic due to their large quantity. (65,000/yr.) Because of their water content, they cannot be composted, and stockpiling them involves significant environmental and phytosanitary risks. Managing potato residues is therefore a big challenge, which will only increase with the enforcement of the Québec Residual Materials Waste Management Policy. This will put increased pressure on the agricultural community to use external residual materials that will compete with on-farm waste. So it is essential that potato residues are well positioned on the organic waste market. To this end, the residues must be transformed, using an available, low-cost process, into a product that is easy to store, transport, and handle and has recognized value as feed, fertilizer, or a source of energy.

Objective(s)

From 2014 to 2017

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Waste conversion

Service

This work will add economic and agronomic value to residual materials.

Partners

Innov'Action | Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

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