Optimizing methods of installing and maintaining commercial paper mulch

Carl Boivin, researcher

Carl Boivin

Researcher

418 643-2380
ext 430

Contact Carl Boivin

Description

The purpose of the project was to develop techniques and tools for maintaining paper mulch during crop growth, particularly during the critical period before the crop is able to help maintain the mulch itself.

Objective(s)

  • Speed up paper mulch installation
  • Develop and test techniques and tools for maintaining paper mulch during the critical period

From 2016 to 2017

Project duration

Market gardening, Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control, Optimal water management

Services

The techniques developed in this project will enhance grower efficiency.

Partners

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | FPInnovation | Dubois Agrinovation‎

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