Potential of a flowering plant mix to encourage natural enemies of caterpillar pests on crucifers (cabbage family)

Description

This three-year project looked at optimal ways of establishing a mix of flowering plants developed in Switzerland, the impact of its use on caterpillar pests of crucifers (abundance, parasitism, and damage), and the profitability and feasibility of using this mix in cabbage crops.

Objective(s)

  • Study the potential of a flowering plant mix developed in Switzerland to encourage natural enemies of caterpillar pests on crucifers in Québec
  • Determine the best conditions for establishing the mix under our conditions
  • Evaluate its impact on caterpillar abundance on crucifers, the damage they cause, and their parasitism rates

From 2015 to 2018

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control, Organic farming

Services

The use of natural crop pest enemies can lead to a decrease in pesticide applications.

Partner

Ministère de l’Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation du Québec - Prime-vert Programme

This may interest you

2018-2019 • Market gardening

Evaluating a protocol for growing organic market garden cabbage using split band applications of granulated laying-hen droppings

This project aims to develop a GHD-based fertilizer management system using split band applications for high-N-demand crops grown in rows, e.g., summer cabbage.

Researcher: Christine Landry

Read more about the project

Christine Landry
Irrigation system
2016-2017 • Market gardening

Improving irrigation management with accurate measurements of effective precipitation

The project consisted of manufacturing and testing a portable rain simulator to estimate, under various conditions, what proportion of irrigation water a crop is able to use.

Researcher: Carl Boivin

Read more about the project

Carl Boivin
Potatoes
2014-2017 • Market gardening

Assessing the potential of using granulated potato residues to produce animal feed, fertilizers, and energy

Managing potato residues is therefore a big challenge, which will only increase with the enforcement of the Québec Residual Materials Waste Management Policy.

Researcher: Christine Landry

Read more about the project

Christine Landry