Potential of a flowering plant mix to encourage natural enemies of caterpillar pests on crucifers (cabbage family)

Josée Boisclair, researcher

Josée Boisclair

Researcher

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Contact Josée Boisclair

Description

This three-year project looked at optimal ways of establishing a mix of flowering plants developed in Switzerland, the impact of its use on caterpillar pests of crucifers (abundance, parasitism, and damage), and the profitability and feasibility of using this mix in cabbage crops.

Objective(s)

  • Study the potential of a flowering plant mix developed in Switzerland to encourage natural enemies of caterpillar pests on crucifers in Québec
  • Determine the best conditions for establishing the mix under our conditions
  • Evaluate its impact on caterpillar abundance on crucifers, the damage they cause, and their parasitism rates

From 2015 to 2018

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control, Organic farming

Services

The use of natural crop pest enemies can lead to a decrease in pesticide applications.

Partner

Ministère de l’Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation du Québec - Prime-vert Programme

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