Exploring the potential of thermal imaging data acquired by drone for the detection of water stress in lowbush blueberries

Carl Boivin, researcher

Carl Boivin

Researcher

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Contact Carl Boivin

Description

The principle behind thermal imaging is based on the fact that plants under water stress have a lower transpiration rate and a higher canopy temperature than plants well supplied with water. Canopy temperatures captured by drone can be used to quickly evaluate water stress in crops like lowbush blueberries and guide decisions as to whether irrigation is required.

Objective(s)

  • Explore the potential of detecting water stress in lowbush blueberries using a thermal infrared imaging sensor installed on a drone

From 2017 to 2018

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Optimal water management

Service

IRDA has recognized expertise in precision farming.

Partners

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | Institut national de la recherche scientifique

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