Distribution of the infection period required by individual ascospores of Venturia inaequalis

Vincent Philion, researcher

Vincent Philion

Researcher, agr., M.Sc.

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Description

Improving the RIMpro software to better predict the risk of infection during rainfall.

Objective(s)

  • Determine how infection speed varies with temperature and to better understand the impact of drying periods on spore survival.
  • Update RIMpro, a free software application already used by producers, based on the results of the project.
  • Improve treatment decisions, with no additional complications or increases in risk, by better defining the period during which germination (stop) treatments are recommended.

From 2015 to 2018

Project duration

Fruit production

Activity areas

Pest, weed, and disease control

Service

This software protects the investments of apple growers in controlling fire blight, a sporadic disease that can completely devastate an orchard in a single season.

Partners

Ministère de l’Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l’Alimentation du Québec | Prime-Vert Programme

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