An innovative and economical air treatment technology for pig farms

Description

A team from IRDA and CRIUCPQ has been working on developing an air treatment unit to reduce pig farm emissions. The objective of the project was to improve the existing experimental design to produce a commercial unit that is cheap to install and operate.

The first phase of the project was aimed at adapting the design of the air treatment unit (ATU) developed by IRDA to produce a commercial unit to be installed at a pig farm. Based on the new concept, we evaluated the efficiency with which the ATU captures standardized dust particles, artificially suspended virus models, and aerosols naturally generated on pig farms. The long-term performance of the ATU on a commercial scale was then evaluated. The last phase of the project was a cost-benefit analysis of this technology.

Objective(s)

  • Produce an innovative, economical ATU that minimizes the propagation of infectious diseases and limits the environmental impact of pig production
  • Transfer a technology ready to be used on Canadian pig farms

From 2016 to 2018

Project duration

Livestock production

Activity areas

Air quality, Coexisting in an agricultural environment

Services

This technology developed by IRDA minimizes the spread of infectious diseases and reduces odours generated by swine production.

Partners

Les éleveurs de porcs du Québec | Centre de recherche de l’Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie du Québec | Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

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