Determining the ideal time to spread pig manure to improve crop yield and protect soil, water, and air quality

Matthieu Girard, researcher

Matthieu Girard

Researcher

418 643-2380
ext 670

Contact Matthieu Girard

Description

Spreading pig manure late in the fall can have a variety of agronomic and environmental benefits To provide extension agents with information on the fertilizing value and environmental impact of spreading pig manure at different times, the project compared the effect of mineral fertilizer to that of pig manure spread in early fall, late fall, and in the spring.

Objective(s)

  • Measure the impact of pig manure spreading date on crop yields and air, water, and soil quality

From 2014 to 2017

Project duration

Field crops

Activity areas

Soil health, Water protection, Air quality, Coexisting in an agricultural environment, Environmental regulations

Services

This project concluded that there is no major agronomic downside to applying slurry later in the fall, beyond currently allowed dates.

Partners

Innov'Action | Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec | Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

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