Developing decision support tools for integrated potato irrigation management

Carl Boivin

Researcher, agr., M.Sc.

418 643-2380
ext 430

Contact Carl Boivin

Description

Producers in Québec receive high quality support on fertilization and crop protection, but they have a harder time accessing expertise in the field of irrigation management. The aim of this project was to set up a support service to equip producers and others in the industry to improve their irrigation management.

Objective(s)

  • Promote the adoption of sound irrigation management by testing the feasibility of establishing a specialized support network in this field

From 2015 to 2017

Project duration

Market gardening

Activity areas

Optimal water management, Water protection

Services

As a result of this project, growers will be able to better utilize water resources, reduce fertilizer use, and boost crop yields.

Partners

Fédération des producteurs de pommes de terre du Québec | Maxi-Sol | Proculteur | Ferme Victorin Drolet | La Ferme des Pionniers | Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec

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