Assessing the cost-effectiveness of improved nitrogen fertilizer applications

Description

This research project, led by the CÉROM grain research centre, looks to assess the cost-effectiveness of nitrogen fertilizer applications improved by the addition of urea, for use with winter wheat crops grown in Québec.

In this project, IRDA’s role will be to analyze the cost-effectiveness of the applications.

Project leader at CÉROM:
Marie Bipfubusa, Ph. D.
Researcher | Crop management
Phone: 450-464-2715, ext. 236
E-Mail: marie.bipfubusa@cerom.qc.ca

Objective(s)

  • Compare the effects of untreated urea and three improved nitrogen fertilizers on:
    • the yields and grain quality of winter wheat
    • the efficiency of N utilization by winter wheat
    • the cost-effectiveness of the winter wheat crop

From 2019 to 2022

Project duration

Field crops

Activity areas

Fertilizer management

Service

IRDA's economic analyses help assess the implementation costs and cost-effectiveness of farming practices.

Partner

Centre de recherche sur les grains

This may interest you

iPad
2015-2017 • Field crops

Economic cost of herbicide resistance in weeds found in field crops

The aim of the project was to estimate the economic impact of herbicide resistance in weeds.

Read more about the project

2018-2020 • Field crops

A study on synchronizing the supply of n from green manure in order to reduce or replace the use of swine slurry as a fertilizer for post-emergent corn, in the context of the transition to organic farming

This project’s main goal is to demonstrate how to satisfy most of the requirements of a strongly N-dependent crop by improving N-supply synchronization, while protecting the farmers’ prior year revenue-generating window.

Researcher: Christine Landry

Read more about the project

Christine Landry
Thistle
2014-2017 • Field crops

Vegetative propagation and regenerative capacity of Canada thistle and sow thistle under organic management

The purpose of this project was to study the vegetative propagation and regeneration capacity of Canada thistle and sow thistle with a view to developing effective weed control strategies.

Researcher: Maryse Leblanc

Read more about the project

Maryse Leblanc